FIVE CREATIVE WAYS TO MAKE MONEY ON TWITTER

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There are plenty ways to make money online and Twitter is one of them.

We share five creative ways to make money on twitter.

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  1. Crowdsourcing

This involves soliciting ideas and contributions from a large group or community. If done correctly it can make you plenty of money, or at least capital for your business or idea. The best way this is done is tweeting to your followers to bring in contributions to fund your business or idea and asking them to help ‘retweet’ to spread the word. Some marketing expertise needs to learn to successfully market your business or idea in order to get positive responses.

2. Produce a Twitter Related Service

You already know that the majority generally use Twitter during their free time, you can take advantage of this by creating a product or service that will appeal to them. A similar product or service might already exist but you can create a better or cheaper one that the users will know and love you for. For example, you can charge people to help them build a Twitter presence and make your prices reasonably and attractively low.

3. Sponsored Tweets

Companies and businesses are willing to pay for your tweets, just as long as you have a large enough following. You can find sponsors willing to pay you to Tweet about their products for an arranged fee.

4. Twitter Contest

A contest is one of the most effective ways to engage people on Twitter. You can try linking up with a local business that wants publicity, offer to hold a contest on Twitter to help them with this publicity and ask to be paid a percentage of sales that come in. Be sure that everything is as legally binding as possible to avoid being cheated. There a lot of fun and enticing ways to engage followers in a twitter contest, just brainstorm a little on it.

5. Sell Your Own Products and Services on Twitter

This might seem obvious but the funny thing is that a lot of people don’t recognize it. Many people aren’t using Twitter to effectively sell their products and services; this unfortunate because Twitter is one of the best ways to do so. Be on the lookout for and take advantage of trending hashtags related to your products and services and use this opportunity to put your work out there for not just your followers to see. Remember, ‘a little self-promotion can quickly lead to a job.’

FOUR WAYS TO TRAVEL SMARTLY IN NIGERIA

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Travelling doesn’t have to be such an expensive and somewhat inconvenient endeavor. It doesn’t have to be an endeavor that’s hard on your finances and lifestyle.  There are ways to make the most of your travelling experience and reduce its pressure on your finances and lifestyle. We share four ways to travel smartly in Nigeria.

  1. Choose Your Means of Transport Wisely

Constantly check for the fares of different legitimate airlines and transport companies; check for their specific discount periods and discount schemes that will be of benefit to you in budgeting and planning for your travel with your decided mode of transportation. This can help maximize your travel experience. Registering on travel and hotel booking portals like Jumia Travel can help with this. You can take advantage of special travel smart deals to save yourself some more money.

2. Organize Your Travel Documents Well

Ensure all your travel documents are in place and are easily accessible, so you don’t have to waste time trying to find them at crucial times. This sort of oversight can end up either delaying your journey or making it entirely impossible. Besides, you’ll save yourself the stress of having to deal with officials that might get hostile or even embarrassing when this happens.

3. Pack Lightly

This can help you avoid excess luggage charges and save you from spending extra money on your travel. Just pack necessary items that can make your travel more convenient and leave behind the rest. Packing with purpose can go a long way in helping you achieve this. Pack with your location in mind and avoid packing things that aren’t versatile.

4. Plan Your Trips

Regardless of it’s a business trip or vacation, you should always endeavor to plan for your travel. From budgeting your travel expenses before and during the trip to the exact kind of hotel or accommodation you intend to stay in, and the means of transport you intent to use at your travel destination. If it’s an Uber you intend to use, plan for it; if taking the bus will be cheaper, plan for it. Plan every little detail of your trip to the best of your ability. Yes things happen, and you might ultimately not be able to execute your entire plan but it will at least keep you relatively in control of your travel experience and help you reduce and very possibly avoid excess and unexpected costs.

Four Tips For Getting Better Audio on Your Smartphone

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Whatever the make of your smartphone, the audio or sound setting is usually moderate. That is, it is not too high nor is it too low. However, when the sound emanating from your smartphone is lower than normal, there must be something wrong.

Today, we will discuss ways to improve the audio quality of your smartphone.

1.Check your music app settings

For every phone, there is an app that plays music. You should check the app’s settings and make necessary adjustments. Have it in mind that the audio won’t go beyond that of the manufacturer’s setting

2.Buy a dedicated accessory

This is another way to boost the sound of your smartphone. You can buy a dedicated accessory like a headphone. With this, you don’t have to always rely on the sound of your phone. The caution here is that you should not tune it too high. This can be dangerous.

3.Install an equalizer app

Not all music app come with an equalizer. An equalizer is usually used to boost the sound on your smartphone. You can download one as there are so many online. Alternatively, you can get a music player with an equalizer.

4.Update your phone

Updates to apps are usually made intermittently. So, your smartphone audio quality may be poor because you have not updated your apps. Try and update your music player to the latest version. There is a very high possibility that your audio quality will significantly improve.

Nine Undeniable Facts About Working in a Nigerian Office

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If you work in a Nigerian office, there are certain things you know to be true about the way things work in the system. It is an open secret that most outsiders fail to see. So, when you come across a young person aspiring to complete tertiary education, move on to the NYSC programme and eventually gain a position in the same Nigerian office you have been coping with, you just shake your head and pray that they survive as you have. Basically, what other option is there, really? The country is hard and gaining employment in the first place is a blessing…so, half bread is better than puff-puff.

The thing, though, is that with typical Nigerian offices, it is actually a different ball game. You come in with the impression that you would be given sensible responsibilities, which you can to carry out with assistance from colleagues who have fully matured and outgrown their puerile proclivities. You also assume that there’s a monthly salary attached for maintaining a decent lifestyle and standard of living…you may be in for a huge surprise. In fact, you better change your mindset.
No doubt, some offices in the country operate differently, especially the ones with a high percentage of expats. Things are normal and even sweet over there; but, it would be of benefit to you to acquaint yourself with some of the many annoying things you will certainly face in a typical Nigerian office environment. This way you are not surprised.

1. Office hierarchy is reflected in everything

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There is no denying it. The concept of “seniority” is a big deal in Nigeria. From as early as primary school to secondary schools and even some universities (no names shall be mentioned), seniors – either someone who is older in age or higher in rank /level of experience – are better regarded. Thus, they get away with anything, including maltreating the juniors. You basically have to do their bidding just because.
Is it any wonder this attitude is taken to Nigerian offices? Agreed, every office operates on a system of hierarchies, however, in Nigerian offices, it is taken to another level.

You must ensure you greet all your senior colleagues before you settle in, otherwise you may get a query or even suspension; if you have booked a room for a meeting and somehow your senior colleague decides to have an impromptu meeting at the time in the same room, you will have to cancel your own meeting oh, because respect if reciprocal…whatever that means.
If there has been an office party, you must make sure your senior colleagues are fed before you help yourself to the bounty; and if your direct “oga” is not in the office when the food is being shared, you must hustle for him and keep his share.
The most ridiculous is when the office cleaner expects you to great her and call her “aunty” or “Ma” and even run some errands for her, just because she is old enough to be your mother and she has been working with the company since it started. The worst is during a brainstorming session when an older colleague shares a rubbish idea and you counter it. The others look at you as though “how dare you, who do you think you are?” You find yourself wondering why you were employed in the first place.

2. You will never be able to eat your food in peace

One would think that in a corporate environment, every staff would plan and make a budget for their meals per day, and in the case where they are not equipped for lunch time, they are able to remain professional about their appetite… but no… not in a Nigerian office.
It is amazing how humble colleagues in a Nigerian office can become when they accost you for “just a spoon of rice” or a sip of coke. They will so praise you! “Njideka , the hottest babe. What are you eating? Share the love na.”
You literally cannot eat your food in peace, unless you leave the office for a restaurant. Even at that, you may find some of your co-workers at the restaurant who will beg you to pay for their food.
It is worse in offices with microwaves because the minute you start warming your food and the aroma fills the air, you will have people trooping in to ask you what kind of food it is and how you made it.
It could also be on the negative where you bring something with a unique or awful smell like Ofada sauce made with locust beans. The news will spread around the office and a lot of people will complain. Side comments like “Biko, who is warming dead body in that microwave?” or “Why put us through this now, must you eat this? Hep us to hep you na” may even shame you into discarding your food.

3. Donating money and signing cards becomes part of your job

In Nigerian offices, especially in Local government and federal offices, the welfare department (where there is one) is just for show. The staff is still expected to chip in to support colleagues who have either lost a parent or spouse, just put to bed, are getting married, recovering from an illness or leaving the company (send-forth). There is always something to donate money to and even sign a card for; so much that you find you have to make a monthly budget for it. Refusing to donate money to any of the cause will most likely have you pegged as a wicked and stingy person. Also, the gossip will be epic.
God forbid that something now happens to you, they will gang up and make a mockery of donating to your situation. It is just best to give what you can really per time.

4. You will “fap” and be “fapped”

Fapping is the order of the day. It is never intentional. You will fap, your colleagues fap from you…everybody is happy. You cannot make noise about it really. From as simple as losing your food or drink (carefully labeled and placed in the office refrigerator) to the “real owners”, to having personal belongings such as your pen, your stapler, your air freshener, or even loose change lying on your table nicked by ghost colleagues, fapping is basically a norm.
Occasionally, there are serious cases of theft which are investigated, but nobody complains about these little ones. You cannot possibly kick up a fuss about a missing stapler.
The sharp comments from colleagues who take offense, are enough to make you endure your loss in peace. Again, you do not want to be marked as the one who always cries wolf – so that when you actually do lose something really important, you can be taken seriously.
There are a few Nigerian offices where discipline is a strong core value and even the security cameras installed in most offices are enough to deter such irresponsible behavior. These kinds of offices, which are the exception are very few in number.
When working in a Nigerian office it is important you stay sharp, observant and cautious rather than complain. Complaining is better when you have evidence.

5. You work extra hours for free

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It is the norm to spend extra hours working in a Nigerian office without extra/overtime pay, no matter what your contract states. Basically, having a strict 9-5 work schedule is a myth. Your line manager, most times, will assign tasks a few minutes to the end of the day with a deadline that ensures you put in extra hours after the stipulated work hours. You cannot even argue with your boss over this, otherwise, he will lecture you on the number of people who are lining up to take over your job if you keep being difficult.
Some people resort to such tactics as calling in sick or losing a family member… to skip work. In fact, even leave may not be granted as it should. But how many times do you want to call really?
In the end, you probably may just have to resign yourself to suffering and smiling, until you find another job.

6. Office flirtation and romance is the norm

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Thanks to bureaucracy, the basic Nigerian office is a boring place… and as expected, most of the workers look for ways to entertain themselves. Since they get to spend a lot of time with each other, colleagues start to find their colleagues – even the ones they normally would not give the time of the day – attractive.
They flirt around and this flirtation sometimes develops into full blown romance and drama. Even some married workers forget their marriage vows while at the office and chase after office interns – with hope to spice up their office life despite the risk of a scandal.
The worst is when a boss starts to make life miserable for a lower staff because they would not sleep with them. Some would even go as far as stripping the staff of their job.
Some Nigerian offices actually have a functional system that allows for maltreated workers to report sexual harassment, but due to the stigma, most now take it into their own hands.
Some have given in, only to record the sexual escapade and use it against these heartless bosses. There has even been a case where the victim set up a meeting with the boss in a hotel, only to arrive with two hefty men who beat the man to a pulp.

7. Your co-workers are your worst enemies

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Office politics is a key aspect of your relationship with your colleagues in Nigerian offices and no matter what you do, you know, without a doubt, that you cannot really trust anyone.
It appears everyone is power hungry and so there is too much ass-licking to get to the top. Due to this, your co-workers -who you probably spend more time with than your family and friends- sometimes, become your worst enemies. The worst kinds are the ones who seems nice and friendly, but secretly believe they are in competition with you and as so they start to plot your downfall without you doing anything to offend them. They closely observe you in order to gain the ammunition they can use against you should the need arise.

Fortunately, there are also a few co-workers who turn out to be god-sent; despite the general idea that they are your worst enemies, they help you grow in the system. Some even provide you with opportunities that you would not have had access to, otherwise.

8. Men almost always rule the day

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Thanks to the feminist movement, women are more empowered now than they were in the past. There are actually female bosses, female CEOs and female managers in Nigerian offices now. There are even female ministers and senators in the government as well. Despite this improvement, women with these positions still have to grapple with the traditional idea that men are superior in Nigerian offices. There seems to be this undying notion that it is “a man’s world”, and as such, subservient roles are still to relegated to women. For instance, in a team of men and women, the women will be expected to organize refreshments, or a female will be expected to serve the tea at the board meeting. Even the lowest staff would feel such roles are beneath him and a senior colleague will have to do it, just because she is female. True, women empowerment is on the rise and things are changing. In some offices, especially female dominated offices, these changes as a result of women empowerment are noticeable; but overall, the effects of these changes are minimal.

9. The salary is never enough

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Have you ever noticed how almost every Nigerian office worker has a side hustle? They are always on the search for a second source of income? This is because they are never paid enough to meet up with the basic lifestyle of a civil servant. Again, discriminatory pay practices are the norm, and as such people are milked to the barest minimum. They are hardly paid based on a general salary schedule.
Even more, bonuses and raises also do not come easily to everyone. The few offices that try to extend benefits to all their staff regulate it and make it a form of competition for the entire staff.

Working in a Nigerian office is something almost every Nigerian would have to experience at one point or the other and while the truths listed above leaves very little for prospective workers to look forward to, it is important to keep them at the back of the mind.

Is there something else you would like to add to this list? Let us know in the comment section!

CREDITS: This article is written by Nkem Ndem.

Meet the Techies Who Are Turning Yaba Into Nigeria’s Silicon Valley

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On the 6th Floor of a discreet building on 294 Herbert Macaulay Rd, Lagos, Nigeria, lies Co-Creation Hub, CcHUB. It was Mark Zuckerberg’s first port of call during his visit to Nigeria in August 2016. The Facebook founder paid a visit to CcHUB to see for himself where the high-tech boom in Lagos has taken off. In years to come 294 Herbert Macaulay Rd will be to technology sector what 51 Iweka Road, Onitsha, is to Nollywood.

I paid a visit to the building a week after Zuckerberg’s stopover. But first, I started with a visit to GRA Ikeja where I met with Francis Ezengige, another high-tech engineer at the heart of hi-tech revolution sweeping across Lagos.

Below are the stories of techies turning Lagos, especially Yaba, into Nigeria’s Silicon Valley.

It was 8.30 pm in Lagos. While most workers were on the last lap of their journey home through the notorious Lagos traffic, the Chief Technology Officer (C.T.O.) and co-founder of Netop Business Systems (Nigeria) Ltd, Mr. Francis Ezengige, was still busy at his office in GRA, Ikeja, Lagos. It was another of those days that he works all through into the midnight. The project at hand was the design and development of a critical solution for MDS Logistics PLC – a division of UAC (United Africa Company).

MDS Logistics is the biggest third party logistic company in West Africa and handles the outbound logistics of several multinationals including Guinness, Glaxo, Promasidor, Michelin, International Distilleries and many others. MDS, which stands for Manufacturers’ Delivery System, is a distribution company with over 60 depots housing multiple warehouses spread across Nigeria. To deliver its function effectively, the company requires Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP), and that was the task that kept Ezengige awake the night I interviewed him.

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Ezengige

When completed, the critical solution would enable MDS handle inventory management, stock movement, sales order processing and storage management. The solution would also assist the company to efficiently deliver goods and services for several local and multinational corporations. Tough task, that is. But Ezengige is thoroughbred professional.

At  49,  he has been at the cutting edge of Information Technology (IT) development in Lagos. Since he graduated in 1990 from the University of Nigeria, Nsukka where he obtained a bachelors degree in electronic engineering, he has worked as software developer and system analyst at different companies.

He later formed Netop Business Systems with his business partner and CEO of the company, Cyril Asuku, and discovered that the journey to nurture a technology startup in Nigeria is a tortuous one.  Their attempt to design an identity management solution called Digital Evidence for banks in 2005 and the struggle to sell a software designed to mitigate fraud in the banking sector in Nigeria were their first litmus test.

“All the big banks turned us down until STB now UBA gave us a chance,” he says. And it took another three years before other banks started patronizing them.  The software used miniature camera on the bank teller PC to capture customers’ images, the fingerprints and the transactions, merging the images with other data in one document and save it. Nestop was the first company to deliver such solution 10years ago. Later the government got interested and formed the National Identity Management Commission, which led to Bank Verification Number (BVN). In fact, capturing the biometrics of bank customers was a later exercise, which was supposed to be an extension of digital evidence. But the idea was later hijacked by other interests and was given to a foreign firm.

While Ezengige and his company have taken Ikeja, the capital of Lagos as their domain, a younger generation of technology buffs is redefining Yaba as the technological hub of Lagos. Tunji Eleso is one of those prime movers. As the former director of Incubation at Co-Creation Hub (CcHUB) and now a managing partner at CcHUB subsidiary, Growth Capital, Mr. Eleso was among those who came to Yaba in 2011 and helped to galvanize like-minded people to relocate to the area. According to him there were about four tech companies in the area when CcHUB arrived. They noticed that Yaba had all the elements of the ecosystem needed for technology to grow.

First, it is at the center of the city, located between Lagos Island and the mainland; two, it is in closer to talents pool such as University of Lagos, Yaba Institute of Technology and Federal College of Science and Technology; and finally there is fair presence of reliable broadband needed for internet connection.

The pioneers took up former Governor Fashola of Lagos State on his bold statement that he wanted to make Lagos the center of innovation in Africa. Working with Lagos State Innovation Advisory Council, Eleso’s team was able to turn the one and half mile radius of Herbert Macaulay Way into a technology hub that it is today.

“Now there are over 60 technological companies in the Yaba area because all major ingredients that are key to the development of the technological sector are there,” Mr. Eleso says.

As part of CcHUB’s goal of facilitating the partnership between citizens, social entrepreneurs and experts, in March of 2011, they threw a challenge to Nigerians asking anyone with exciting idea that would bridge the gap between government and citizens to submit ideas. And they received 45 ideas and which was pruned down to six.  CcHUB took the six ideas into a hackathons where they brought experts, developers, artists and software engineers who were given 48 hours to build a prototype of the idea. At the end of the 48 hours, a panel of experts judged the various pitches. According to Eleso, BudgIT, which now monitors capital projects across Nigeria states, came second.

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Mark Zuckerberg, Tunji Eleso and others at the CcHub in Yaba.

“So, in many ways, BudgIT and its development was as a result of the collaboratory effort around seeking a problem area and bringing all those that are critical to that problem area together to start the process of solving the problem,” says Eleso.

Using a similar process, Eleso said that in 2012, Efiko, a mobile testing platform for students that supplements learning, was developed. While Efiko came first, ASA, a platform that helps young children connect to their culture, came third. ASA uses games and animations to reinforce the learning of language, folklores and other cultural ethos.

In March 14 of this year, Growth Academy with Intel Africa had a 3-month accelerator course hosted by CcHUB. It selected 10 out of over 102 startups that applied. The 10 startups are EdvesSuite, VergeNG, Mamalette, Tuteria, GoMyWay, DropBuddies, Eazyhire, VacantBoards, GeniiGames and Wesabi. In April 12, Facebook in conjunction with CcHUB hosted a meeting for developers in Lagos at the Herbert Macaulay Way, Yaba, Lagos, office of CcHUB. Six startups were chosen for the meeting. They were Truppr, Lifebank, Genii Games, BudgIT, Mamalette and Grit Systems.

Eleso said that international high tech companies like Google, Facebook, Intel, Oracle, and Microsoft work with them to develop indigenous tech companies because Nigeria’s tech ecosystem helps them to extend their own services. “They come and do a lot of trainings to make sure that software developers are better skilled,” Eleso says. “But more importantly, they are better able to support the development of these applications either by preloading them or featuring them at conferences.”

At this year’s F8 Facebook Conference in San Francisco, four Nigerian apps were featured. Zikko, Afrinolly, Jobberman and My Music. Nigerian techies joined others across the world to watch at F8 Meetups in Lagos.

Abiodun Thorpe, a technology enthusiast, has an office at the CcHUB in Yaba, Lagos, where he creates phone and web apps. He said that having an office at CcHUB enhanced the work he does. “My relationship with CcHUB has been incredible knowing the space from idea stage to what it is today. Some startups like BudgIT, Wecyclers, Asa, Efiko and others have made the space attractive to social entrepreneurs,” he says. “The community space is great for collaboration, quick feedback on projects, amongst other things. “

Thorpe is currently working on a simple platform called KiniScore (www.KiniScore.com). It aims to give real-time, on demand, live scores updates on African Leagues games. He said that the government needed to do more to enhance the work they are doing. “Stable power, reliable connectivity, market research data and sometimes the huge disconnect between products and its target users,” he says are some of the obstacle they still face. “The government needs to do more than just throwing money at some elephant projects, because prosperity of a nation is a function of prosperity of the businesses in there.”

There is no shortage of ideas from Nigerian youths. Nigeria, with a population of 188 million out of which 70% are under 30, the human resources are enormous. Lagos state alone is home to 23 million people. The Nigerian Bureau of Statistics stated that unemployment rate in Nigeria is at 10.4% for the last quarter of last year. It is estimated that 22.45 million Nigerians are either unemployed or underemployed.

Last month, the Nigerian police opened a recruitment exercise for 10,000 positions. In less than a month they received over 800,000 applications. When Francis Ezengige advertised for opening for programmers at his company, over 200 people applied from different fields of study. He said that out of the number he was able to get ten good candidates who became great programmers even though most of them did not study programming at the university. “The rate of conversion from different fields of study to IT is very high,” he says. “Nigerian youths are great programmers and they can match programmers anywhere in the world.”

Ezengige pointed out that before MDX contacted his Netop, they tried to use solutions from foreign programmers and failed because those foreign solutions couldn’t provide solutions to peculiarities in Nigerian businesses. “The problem is Nigerians accepting that we are capable of producing software that is not just as good as what is out there but that could possibly out class what is out there,” Ezengige says.

CREDITS: This article is written by by Rudolf Ogoo Okonkwo,and was first published on http://saharareporters.com/2017/04/07/people-turning-yaba-nigeria%E2%80%99s-silicon-valley-0

 

Hero dog dies saving wedding guests from suicide bomber in Nigeria|By Sharon Marris, News Reporter

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Image: A Nigerian soldier with his sniffer dog in Maiduguri, which has been the target of many suicide bombings. (File pic)

A dog is being hailed as a hero after stopping a suicide bomber from killing wedding guests.

The guests were in the Nigerian village of Belbelo, near the north-eastern city of Maiduguri, when the teenage bomber tried to detonate her explosives.

Police spokesman Victor Isuku said the bomber, believed to be from Boko Haram, had been making her way into the wedding party on Sunday morning when the dog attacked her.

“This forced the suspect to detonate her explosive, while battling to wriggle herself from the claws and jaws of the dog,” he said in a statement reported by Nigerian media.

“The dog stopped the teenage suicide bomber from detonating her strapped improvised explosive devices on the wedding crowd of people.”

No guests were injured but the dog was killed by the explosion, alongside the bomber.

Maiduguri.jpgImage: Two children, thought to be just seven or eight, blew themselves up in Maiduguri in December

No further details were given about the dog, which is understood to have belonged to one of the wedding party guests.

Mr Isuku said the attempted bombing happened just a few hours after three other suicide bombers blew themselves up at two other locations not far from the wedding ceremony.

Islamist group Boko Haram has a history of using women or children for such assaults, especially in Borno state, of which Maiduguri is the capital.

The females can be used as sex slaves or human bombs, while boys are also abducted and forced to fight.

Back in December, two girls, thought to be aged seven or eight, were blamed for a double suicide bombing in Maiduguri that killed one person and injured 17.

Boko Haram has been fighting Nigeria’s government since 2009 to impose hardline Islamic rule over the country’s mainly Muslim north.

Since then, at least 20,000 people have been killed, more than 2.5 million have had to flee their homes and thousands of women and girls have been abducted by the group.

Nigerian president Muhammadu Buhari has said the Islamic uprising had been “technically defeated”.

However, the Nigerian army is still struggling against the suicide attacks, looting and indiscriminate killing.

How Technology is Improving Education |By Chukwuemeka Fred Agbata

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Chukwuemeka Fred Agbata, presenter of Tech Trends on Channels Television

 

The importance of Education Technology, Edu-Tech for short, in modern day teaching and learning cannot be over-emphasized, especially now that ICT has taken a pivotal role in our everyday life.

Today, there are many applications available for distant learning through online means, etc. I recently interviewed Wale Ogunjobi, Founder of Primaltutor.com.ng on the input of technology on education.

Wale Ogunjobi is a digital trainer, digital consultant and motivational speaker.

On ways that technology is assisting in solving some of the problems in our education sector, Wale is of the view that one of the ways is the reach which technology enables more people to have access to education and also allows some that are unable to afford to attend an institution or learning centre, can easily have access to an e-learning platform and learn from there.

Another area that technology is assisting in solving the problems in the education sector, he said is in the affordability as most of the online courses are cheaper and affordable. A third point Wale raised is that, with technology, the barrier of distance has been broken as you can even learn without leaving the confines of your bedroom.

Wale concurred that the rate of adoption of learning platforms by the public is low and the reason for this may be because of inadequate policies.

He is of the view that, if there are policies on ground to support Edu-Tech, this might be a plus for the sector in terms of patronage. He, however, stated that there has been some improvement in patronage in recent times.

Stating some of the problems his startup, Primaltutor.com.ng is solving, Wale stated that, apart from educating people, his platform is trying to solve the platform of unemployment as the platform has so far absorbed over 300 tutors that train on the platform. He stated that the process of certifying these trainers involves going through series of tests, interviews, etc., as the platform only seeks to ensure that the trainers on the platform train only in their areas of strength and competence.

As a Startup, Wale stated that some of the problems he faced when he started and which he is still facing include the issue of penetrating the market because of lack of trust as well as inadequate infrastructure.

Reacting to a question as to mentors working with him on his startup, Wale responded that he has been working with some mentors.

He stressed that, for a startup to be successful, he needs to have a mentor to put him through on how to run the business successfully in the areas of marketing strategy, financials, etc. In his own case, Wale said he has mentors for different aspects of his startup.

Stressing on some opportunities he sees in the Edu-Tech sector that Nigeria is not yet seeing as a country. Wale pointed out the huge opportunities in terms of knowledge-based economy such as it is helping advanced countries like the UK and the USA. In those climes, he said, they leverage on Edu-Tech to platforms where citizens can study up to the PhD level without even stepping into the four walls of a university. Wale believes that government policies can really help to deepen and fast-track the Edu-Tech sector.

Wale is of the view that more startups should be encountered to invest in the Edu-Tech sector if we really want to solve the problems we have in our education sector and the startups should focus on taking on the Nursery.

Primary and Secondary school levels while the tertiary level, which is a more advanced one, could be addressed as time goes on. He sees a bright future for the Edu-Tech sector as long as the right government policies to make it thrive are put in place as it is the next phase of education in Nigeria.

CFA is the Founder, www.CFAtech.ng & Co-producer/Presenter, Tech Trends on Channels Television